Kresimir Antonio Paliska,Senior Vice President
Kresimir Antonio Paliska Senior Vice President

Research shows that most doctors (89%)1 see patients who have gotten health information from the internet. The internet is huge. There are hundreds of thousands of medical websites. When I typed diabetes into a search engine, I got 621 million results! Some provide reliable health content. Some do not. Some of the medical news is current. Some of it is not. The web is rife with unfounded and often harmful information regarding your health and welfare. Choosing which websites to trust is an important step in gathering reliable health information.

We all share a common concern: “How can I trust the health content I find on the Internet?” It is important to keep the following facts in mind because:

 

  1. Anyone can post information on the Internet
  2. Search engine results are selected by computer software and not by human experts
  3. Websites may be sponsored by companies that are selling products so may not provide objective information

 

Medical Content Certification has been developed to encourage the dissemination of quality health information for patients and professionals and the general public. It also is designed to promote the latest and most relevant medical data through the use of the internet. We get job done for you, and cover the most important questions everyone should ask himself/herself before consider to use search engine(s):

 

  1. Does the website provide medical editors with a reference indicating their qualifications?
  2. Is the information reviewed by credentialed experts?
  3. Does the website offer quick and easy solutions to your health problems?
  4. Are miracle cures promised?
  5. Does the web content provider publish accurate contact information?
  6. What do they want from you?
  7. Who sponsors the website?
  8. Does the site’s information favor the sponsor?
  9. Does the site make unbelievable claims?
  10. Does the website clearly distinguish its product from external advertising content?
  11. Is it up-to-date?
  12. Is your privacy protected?
  13. Does the website clearly state a privacy policy?

 

Or you can just check if the website is certified for trustworthy. In this way, we at AACI help to assure quality and objective, transparent medical information for internet users.

 

Bibliography:

  1. https://www.wect.com/2019/06/24/study-finds-us-citizens-turn-google-before-their-doctor/
  2. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000869.htm
  3. https://agerrtc.washington.edu/info/factsheets/internet